Strange Bedfellows IV

Nat Hentoff senses the stink of dishonesty:

On March 15’s Nightline, in an appallingly one-sided, distorted account of the Schiavo case, Terri’s husband, Michael—who’d like to marry the woman he’s now living with—said that once Terri’s feeding tube is removed at his insistent command, Terri “will drift off into a nice little sleep and eventually pass on and be with God.”

As an atheist, I cannot speak to what he describes as his abandoned wife’s ultimate destination, but I can tell how Wesley Smith (consultant to the Center for Bioethics and Culture)—whom I often consult on these bitterly controversial cases because of his carefully researched books and articles—describes death by dehydration.

In his book Forced Exit (Times Books), Wesley quotes neurologist William Burke: “A conscious person would feel it [dehydration] just as you and I would. . . . Their skin cracks, their tongue cracks, their lips crack. They may have nosebleeds because of the drying of the mucous membranes, and heaving and vomiting might ensue because of the drying out of the stomach lining. “They feel the pangs of hunger and thirst. Imagine going one day without a glass of water! . . . It is an extremely agonizing death.”

Nader? Hentoff? Jackson? I’m awfully glad to be a liberal again.

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