What’s the next mission for the LHC?

Tech Week:

Fresh collisions will be launched in two years’ time as CERN looks into other phenomena, such as anti-matter. They will create a significant amount of additional data for the IT team to deal with. When they need to, each of the site’s four particle detector hubs – ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHCb – take what amounts to 40 million pictures a second, producing 40 petabytes of information. Whilst not all of that information is kept – much of it related to already understood physics rather than interesting new particles – there is still 25GB a second that has to be thrown on standard discs and tapes…

When the giant underground tube starts seeing particles smashing into one another again, the backend systems need to be ready for the extraordinary amount of data that will come through, whilst supporting the bespoke code that picks out the interesting collisions…it’s like helping to “find a needle in a haystack when you don’t know what a needle is”…the LHC does not have enough budget to build as many systems as CERN would like, partly thanks to the current European economic climate. Nor has it been able to bring in new workers, even where additional systems have been installed.

So it appears that the LHC schedule may not be met. Well at least the earth wasn’t destroyed by the darned thing. Perhaps the funding lag is related to the LHC already having discovered the Higgs Boson. As explained here in this video, that apparently was the main mission of the LHC, and it accomplished it promptly and left the Standard Model intact. Now what?

Leave a Reply