No A+ for the Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice

Youssef Ibrahim:

The letter “X” soon may be banned in Saudi Arabia because it resembles the mother of all banned religious symbols in the oil kingdom: the cross. The new development came with the issuing of another mind-bending fatwa, or religious edict, by the infamous Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice…

The Saudi commission has shaped life and death: declared jihad against Soviet soldiers in Afghanistan, banished women from public life, and forced piety at the tip of the whip and the sword. Its edicts have hindered business, education, travel, women’s rights, and life itself, creating a fertile ground for terrorism and producing the 15 Saudis who participated in the September 11, 2001, attacks — and many others like them.

Among the commission’s deeds is the famed 1974 fatwa — issued by its blind leader at the time, Sheik Abdul Aziz Ben Baz — which declared that the Earth was flat and immobile. In a book issued by the Islamic University of Medina, the sheik argued: “If the earth is rotating, as they claim, the countries, the mountains, the trees, the rivers, and the oceans will have no bottom.” Another bright light of the commission, Sheik Abdel-Aziz al-Sheikh, recently stopped a government reform proposal aimed at creating work for women by allowing them to replace male sales clerks in women’s clothing stores. Sheik al-Sheikh damned the idea, saying it was a step “towards immorality and hellfire.” The underlying logic is breathtaking: Women are more protected by buying their knickers from men! Over the years, the commission has rendered Saudi Arabia a true kingdom of darkness. Movie theaters are banned, as are sculptures, paintings, and music, and the mixing of sexes in public.

The commission really has it in for women. They must don the all-enveloping veil, or niqab, in public; they cannot drive themselves nor ride anywhere without a male guardian, and they cannot travel alone domestically or abroad.

The commission also excels at banning the construction of houses of worship — other than mosques — even though the majority of the 8 million expatriates working in the kingdom come from Christian, Hindu, and Buddhist faiths. Indeed, celebrating a private Sunday Mass inside a home could lead to jail, public lashings, and expulsion.

How do they feel about the letter T — as in Tolerance? Gee, we really should encourage these people to open more mosques and schools in the United States so that they can preach their values and way of life here.

2 Responses to “No A+ for the Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice”

  1. nick Says:

    Sounds an awful lot like the Western Left`s agenda driven MO, does it not?

  2. gs Says:

    Sorry, the previous comment had an HTML typo, so please delete if possible. (Jack, a comment preview feature would be appreciated.)

    Gee, we really should encourage these people to open more mosques and schools in the United States so that they can preach their values and way of life here.

    Bush is on it.

    From nick: Sounds an awful lot like the Western Left`s agenda driven MO, does it not?

    The Saudi scholarship plan provides the Wahabis with a mechanism for attracting the American universities that are most eager to pander to them (in contrast to going out and searching for these places).

    In effect, the Saudi scholarships may be facilitating link-ups between the administration’s domestic enemies and the Wahabis.

    It’s not surprising that the Republicans lost the recent election. They may lose the next one too; if they nominate a presidential candidate who is perceived to be in the current Bush mold, it could be a blowout.

    (NB: I hope that Bush salvages his presidency in the next two years, but what I hope and what I expect are two distinct things.)

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