Archive for the 'MSM' Category

The 100%ers

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

You’ve heard of the 1%, the 99% and the 47% of course. Now there are the 100%ers too. A fellow wrote an amusing and sad piece about intolerance and the death of free speech. It claimed that unless you toed the party line on 100% of all issues of the day, you were excommunicated as a heretic, banned for life, and told to shut up. An atheist PETA supporter said he liked the piece. Guess what happened to him.

Ad fontes

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

Terry Teachout on TCM’s 20th anniversary in the WSJ:

On Monday it will be showing, among other things, “The Adventures of Robin Hood,” “Casablanca,” “Citizen Kane,” “Gaslight,” “Gone With the Wind,” “It Happened One Night,” “The Maltese Falcon” and “Singin’ in the Rain.” You couldn’t ask for a more representative sampling of the best of studio-era Hollywood…Ever since its launch, the audience for TCM has consisted primarily of people who want to watch studio-era movies. While the channel has diversified its offerings over the years, it remains committed to accommodating the conservative tastes of its regular viewers, which is why it steers clear of the franker films that Hollywood started to release around 1970. Look at the schedule for the month of April and you’ll find just 20 films made after 1970, most of them forgettable mediocrities.

If you believe, as I do, that American film entered a new period of artistic maturity in the 1970s, you’ll find little to confirm that belief. Where are “Apocalypse Now,” “Cabaret,” “Chinatown,” “The Deer Hunter,” “The Godfather,” “The Last Picture Show,” “Network,” “Patton” and “Taxi Driver”? Not on TCM. Nor do its potential problems stop there. With under-30 moviegoers reflexively tuning out black-and-white films because they look old fashioned, how can a channel that specializes in the oeuvre of Gary Cooper, Katharine Hepburn and Jimmy Stewart hope to eventually replace its aging viewers

The Renaissance was marked by a return ad fontes, to the texts of Greek and Roman classics, and indeed the Reformation featured a return to an ancient text. Things can get lost for hundreds of years, like perspective in art, and then get rediscovered, to the great benefit of civilization.

TCM is not just entertainment; it is a course in American history. Unique in that it is the first time in history we have the voices and pictures of human beings of yesteryear speaking to us directly. In important cultural ways, the America shown on TCM is superior to that of the 70′s and thereafter — the 40-80% illegitimacy trend of the last four decades is a cultural disaster of the first order.

TCM should stick to its knitting, and not worry that kids might currently prefer 3D to B&W. Niche marketing is fine. More importantly, kids can grow up and perhaps discover that BS and malarkey aren’t a viable path to rewarding lives. In that sense, TCM isn’t just a view of the past frozen in amber, but a reminder that a better future culture is possible.

(Incidentally, both Scott Johnson and Mark Steyn would be excellent fill-ins for Robert Osborne, but TCM’s chairman emeritus might object.)

Worth reading today

Sunday, April 13th, 2014

Kevin Williamson has a very amusing piece on the life in the Beltway. Many of Mark Steyn’s readers are also pretty good writers. Some anniversaries arriving: it’s ten years since Kill Bill (Sheriff Earl Parks and Esteban Vihaio are the same guy), and coming up on ten years in August since the forging of the Rathergate memos. Finally, we can report that from seeing college age kids talk that George Will’s statement on TV today is true, as political correctness morphs into absurdity (not that it was such a long trip).

Strange and getting stranger

Saturday, April 12th, 2014

Ali, Steyn, Steyn, McCarthy, and Simon on the Brandeis debacle. (BTW, does Steyn have a twin brother? He seems to be writing at light speed these days.) And what about the incredibly weird BLM story from Nevada? Finally, can’t the MSM even photoshop competently? Good night and good luck.

Shoe, meet other foot please

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

WSJ: in a column about the 77 cents rubbish, we learn that 92% of work-related deaths are men. But it’s hazardous being a lady, particularly if you might get an honorary degree or join the board of a public company. (We’ve previously commented on both ladies here and here.) Question: what’s missing from these stories that we’d be hearing about nonstop if the shoe was on the other foot?

Today’s silliness

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

Here’s some silliness. Here’s commentary on the silliness. Here’s another thimble full of silliness. What’s the deal? How come when problems have largely disappeared or affect an extremely small number of people the shouts and indignation become louder than ever? (Hysteria is part of the explanation — things are supposed to be perfect now, and reality isn’t behaving properly, therefore: eek! a mouse!)

Miscellany

Sunday, April 6th, 2014

Smith and Wesson has a market cap of less than a billion dollars. Meanwhile, the maker of this game just went public in an IPO with a valuation of over $7 billion. Go figure.

In other news, Wretchard explores the increasingly strange world of banned v. compulsory, which we noted in passing the other day (that’s the 1790′s BTW.) Chubby Checker has some thoughts on the subject.

Final point from the shameless plug department: Liz Smith wrote a fabulous review of this forthcoming book authored by a friend of ours. Buy it! (Janet Maslin is not a fan of his, so perhaps that’s an additional reason to buy it.)

April 1?

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

The NYT actually ran this on 3/25:

I believed this legislation, signed four years ago this month, would free people to pursue their dreams, start new companies and not worry about the health insurance penalty. What I didn’t count on was that it would make things harder for me and my wife.

First, we were notified that we would be kicked out of our existing $263-a-month Anthem Blue Cross plan because it didn’t meet the minimum standards of the new law. No problem, I thought. The plans in the new Covered California exchange would most likely be better and cheaper.

But we were shocked at what we confronted. The least expensive premium for a couple like us in our 40s would be about $620 a month. And because our household adjusted gross income is likely to be over the $62,040 cutoff this year, it’s doubtful we’ll end up with a subsidy to help offset that price increase…

I have mild asthma. Normally it’s not a problem, but when I get a chest cold, it becomes severe. One recent day I found that I couldn’t breathe. My inhalers were all expired. I’d held off refilling them since my insurance would reduce the costs of the $58.99 inhalers only by a little more than $9. I knew from past experience that I probably needed a prescription for antibiotics, so I tried frantically to find a medical facility that would take our new Covered California Anthem Blue Cross bronze plan. When I did, they said it would be three weeks before I could see a doctor…

(Nelson developed a skin infection. I got an appointment at the vet’s the next day. They prescribed an antibiotic…The medication caused diarrhea so I called his internist at his vet hospital, PetCare, and she prescribed a probiotic. Nelson’s $40.42-a-month pet insurance…paid almost all of these costs…I was envious. My 11-year-old brown Labrador was getting the kind of treatment that I could only dream of. I wanted to go to PetCare. I wanted pet insurance.)…

It’s still hard to understand what coverage we have. It’s like trying to read tea leaves. Benefits descriptions can be contradictory and run nearly 200 pages long. One summary attached to my online account seems to say that if I go to the emergency room, I could potentially owe thousands of dollars. Another document suggests that I’m responsible for only $300. I’ve had two representatives give me two different explanations…the new plan has more coverage, including pediatric vision. But we don’t have children…

if you see a doctor outside your network, look out. We found this out the hard way. My wife and I both had to see a doctor in January. Our old policy and our new Covered California policy were both with Anthem Blue Cross, so a representative there told us to use our old ID cards for our visits since our new cards hadn’t arrived yet. We were covered, he assured us. At the medical center, we gave our ID cards to the receptionist, who accepted them as valid, and went in to see our regular doctors. But later we found out that they were not in our new network’s plan. The out-of-pocket cost for my simple 30-minute office visit: $303. My wife’s annual exam and a couple of minor procedures: $918.

We’re still waiting for quality health care that we can actually use, afford and understand

What a complainer this former WaPo reporter is! Doesn’t he know that if he liked his doctor, he could keep his doctor? Doesn’t he know that if he liked his plan he could keep his plan? Period! (It’s rather amazing to see a guy like this sound just like Ann Coulter.)

Of cowboys and cow dung

Sunday, March 30th, 2014

Peter Bogdanovich has a delightful piece on Scott Eyman’s new book about Duke Morrison, the American screen cowboy. One of the roles that transformed his career was about a tough cattle drive. Gotta get those cows to move their hind quarters quickly to their last roundup. That was then.

Sadly, this is now: Mark Steyn has a mooving commentary on America’s (and the West’s) current take on the bovine posterior. (BTW, if you’re interested in cutting government waste, every one of these horses’s patoots could be downsized.)

Low, going lower

Monday, March 24th, 2014

In a world where this is considered normal, this is what you get. They sow not; neither do they reap. But they sure can complain and lecture.

Lighter side: Moonglow and a scene from Picnic.

Through a glass darkly no more

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

Scott Johnson has a Tough Guy vs. Wimp visual that is pretty funny but misses an important point. The so-called wimp can be a tough guy — here and here are evidence as to whom he despises and is more than willing to act against. This is consistent with the standard religion of leftism by the way, that the US is an imperialist bad actor that has created enemies abroad and repression at home. Exactly what the faculty lounge is all about, but quite a bit more intense and ruthless. (BTW, these fellows and gals are often seriously lacking in historical knowledge, but they fill in the blanks with ideology; after all, truth isn’t about truth, it’s about a technique to get power to enforce equality of outcomes.)

Ah, but how did we get so far away from the America many of us know in our bones? The answers are the university and the media. 3% of Yale donations went to Romney, which is pretty good, by the way. The media are 12-1 against conservatives, which we think slightly understates the case. Still, it’s kind of shocking that things have gotten this bad this fast; yet we only have to look back to the cases of Iran and Honduras to see that the pattern was fully formed and evident years ago. But still, this far this fast? Well, citizens, pause to consider a breathtaking exercise in projection from five years ago, and consider what, unfettered, this level of narcissism has wrought. And there you have it, this far this fast…

ACA = VA

Sunday, March 16th, 2014

ACA = VA, more or less. This really wasn’t all that hard to figure out. So much for the BS. They think you’re stupid, particularly the Julias, and so far they’ve been right. But things may change

“Sometimes-inefficient”

Friday, March 14th, 2014

NYT:

For industrial output, the expansion of 8.6 percent for the two months, compared with the same period last year, was the weakest since April 2009. Retail sales growth, at 11.8 percent, was the weakest since early 2011. Investment in fixed assets rose 17.9 percent, the weakest pace in more than a decade. The January and February figures were grouped together to reduce distortions from the Lunar New Year holiday, which moves from year to year and can fall in either month. To some extent, the slowdown in China’s growth is the result of deliberate engineering by policy makers. Beijing realizes that the economy must shift away from exports and heavy manufacturing, and toward consumption-led growth,. At the same time, it is trying to rein in the sometimes-inefficient lending that has taken place during the last few years

Sometimes-inefficient lending? Could this rather inappropriate delicate tone have anything to do with China’s kicking NYT reporters out of the country?

Final point: check out the CSFB chart in this piece.

Don’t be a Silly Billy

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

Imagining a public figure giving unusual responses to the media.

“You think that 9996 parts of the air have no power but that 4 bits are going to cause a catastrophe? Go out for a walk and don’t be a Silly Billy.”

“You think in the 21st century that human nature has changed since the days of Cain and Abel? Lose the progress metaphor and don’t be a Silly Billy.”

“You think that centralizing health care is a good thing? Learn something from Wikipedia and the app store and don’t be a Silly Billy.”

Must be better ways, but the tone ought to be scorn without anger.

The university, the media, and the rest of us

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

Gallup has a poll showing what people from L to R and in-between care about. It’s a little surprising in that there’s so much agreement on important things. OTOH, here’s a typical college voting 26-3 in favor of nonsense. The media, of course, are just like the college kids: they’ve mostly never worked a day in their lives in the real world, i.e., the private sector. Too bad politics is downstream of culture.

Dots

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

CNN:

The passengers are Delavar Seyed Mohammad Reza, 29, and Pouri Nourmohammadi, 18. They entered Malaysia on February 28 using valid Iranian passports. To fly out of Malaysia, Reza and Nourmohammadi used passports that were stolen in Thailand, a booming market for stolen passports. The passports belonged to citizens of Italy and Austria…Authorities said they don’t know how Reza and Nourmohammadi came to possess the passports.

On Saturday, Reza used the Italian’s passport; Nourmohammadi used the Austrian’s. According to Thai police, an Iranian man named Kazem Ali bought one-way tickets for the men, describing them as friends who wanted to return home to Europe. While Ali made the initial booking by telephone, Ali or someone acting on his behalf paid cash for the tickets, police said.

The tickets were purchased at the same time from China Southern Airlines in Thailand’s baht currency and at identical prices, according to China’s official e-ticket verification system Travelsky. The ticket numbers are consecutive, implying they were issued together.

Both were for travel from Kuala Lumpur to Amsterdam via Beijing. The ticket for the man who was using the Italian passport continued to Copenhagen, Denmark. The ticket for the holder of the Austrian passport ended in Frankfurt, Germany.

We have no idea where this is heading, but there so far seems to be an absence of information on the 29 year old. The Daily Mail has a piece with many photos of those who were on the plane.

21st century thinking

Sunday, March 9th, 2014

AFP:

In his first department-wide policy guidance statement since taking office a year ago, he told his 70,000 staff: “The environment has been one of the central causes of my life.” “Protecting our environment and meeting the challenge of global climate change is a critical mission for me as our country’s top diplomat,” Kerry said in the letter issued on Friday to all 275 US embassies and across the State Department. “It’s also a critical mission for all of you: our brave men and women on the frontlines of direct diplomacy,” he added in the document seen by AFP. He urged all “chiefs of mission to make climate change a priority for all relevant personnel and to promote concerted action at posts and in host countries to address this problem….We’re talking about the future of our earth and of humanity. We need to elevate the environment in everything we do,” he said. It was, he said “our call to conscience as citizens of this fragile planet we inhabit.”

WRM also notes the tragic and morally inverted worldview of the self-styled intelligentsia.

Gas attack

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

What passes for wisdom today: “in the old Westerns or gangster movies, right, everyone puts their gun down just for a second. You sit down, you have a conversation; if the conversation doesn’t go well, you leave the room…if you look at Iranian behavior, they are strategic, and they’re not impulsive. They have a worldview, and they see their interests, and they respond to costs and benefits.” Fellow sure likes the sound of his own voice, and he’s far from alone in his naïveté. It’s what they really believe inside the beltway, the media, the media, and the academy. There’s a war on, but only one side is fighting.

Smokin’ dope

Monday, March 3rd, 2014

Wow. Watch the first few minutes of this interview of the Secretary of State. It features this:

It’s really 19th century behavior in the twenty-first century…You just don’t invade another country on phony pretexts in order to assert your interests

Why not? And what’s with this 19th century business? Have human nature, national interests, and the will to power all disappeared recently? WRM comments on the strange views of the academy, media and policy elites.

The thirties and so forth

Sunday, March 2nd, 2014

We see that the Russian troops in the Ukraine and related developments have caused the words Anschluss and Sudetenland to reappear all of a sudden. And on our team we have the Stanley Baldwin of this era. Russia, Iran, Syria and everyone else on the planet have old Stanley figured out. (Well, maybe not the WaPo editorial board.) It’s likely to get much worse in the next couple of years, as all of America’s adversaries know they can now act without any fear of reprisal.

How’s this for a US response: “Russia’s continued violation of Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity would negatively impact Russia’s standing in the international community.” Can’t get much more pathetic than that.

Oh yes you can: check out the photo at the bottom of this piece. Question: why go out of your way to make yourself look like a fool?